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Somewhere, sometime, someday, somehow, you'll find them
."

- Danielle Steel, Bittersweet.

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Sunday, November 16, 2014

Video of the Week - The Perils of Indifference

This past week, the Kenyan media has been inundated with video footage, discussions on both radio and TV, and thousands of words both in print and on the web all reacting to two separate incidents where ladies who were allegedly scantily dressed were stripped by some irate members of the public.

One happened at the Coast and the other in Nairobi.
I must say the two videos are quite distressing, and one can only wonder what would justify this kind of savagely.

We recently examined crowd behavior thanks to another incident where Gor Mahia fans allegedly looted and damaged property in Machakos town. At some point on Nation FM's morning discussion the day before last, Lorna Irungu-Macharia suggested that human beings are now more violent but thankfully, Chris Hart quickly busted that myth, as Steven Pinker also did at TED. You may be surprised to realized that we are now more peaceful than ever before.

Back in April 12, 1999 in Washington DC, Eliezer 'Elie' Wiesel gave a moving speech on the perils of indifference. President Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary, among other guests were in attendance. Mr Wiesel survived the Holocaust and is the author of Night.

Whereas I do not condone what happened to the two ladies and other victims of such violence, I'd thought of staying away from the discourse emanating from the two cases, but on second thought, I realize that it amounts to indifference. Here's what Elie Wiesel says about indifference:
Of course, indifference can be tempting -- more than that, seductive... for the person who is indifferent, his or her neighbor are of no consequence. And, therefore, their lives are meaningless. Their hidden or even visible anguish is of no interest. Indifference reduces the Other to an abstraction.

Indifference, after all, is more dangerous than anger and hatred. Indifference, then, is not only a sin, it is a punishment. - See more at: http://blog.peternjenga.com/2010/01/perils-of-indifference.html#sthash.dnMgmGTe.dpuf
Of course, indifference can be tempting -- more than that, seductive... for the person who is indifferent, his or her neighbor are of no consequence. And, therefore, their lives are meaningless. Their hidden or even visible anguish is of no interest. Indifference reduces the Other to an abstraction.

Indifference, after all, is more dangerous than anger and hatred. Indifference, then, is not only a sin, it is a punishment. - See more at: http://blog.peternjenga.com/2010/01/perils-of-indifference.html#sthash.dnMgmGTe.dpuf
Of course, indifference can be tempting -- more than that, seductive... for the person who is indifferent, his or her neighbor are of no consequence. And, therefore, their lives are meaningless. Their hidden or even visible anguish is of no interest. Indifference reduces the Other to an abstraction.

Indifference, after all, is more dangerous than anger and hatred. Indifference, then, is not only a sin, it is a punishment.
Connect Magazine has a significant readership and I can humbly submit that this post may just change the attitudes of one person - which will be in line with our stated objective to write what has meaning, makes a difference and adds value.

Watch Elie and the Clintons below:
April 1999, in Washington, D.C.
April 1999, in Washington, D.C.



An extract of the above speech with some excerpts is available on The Walkabout.Be sure to check it out.

* * *

I personally maintain the firm belief that society can indeed change, and for better.
This may as well have been Amy Grant's Grown Up Christmas List, but it remains my everyday wish as far as human interaction is concerned.



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